News — Truncated Domes

Concrete Gets A New Recipe

Truncated Domes

Concrete Gets A New Recipe

The most widely used construction material on the planet, it has given us sculptural buildings, sturdy bridges and dams, parking garages and countless other structures that surround us. But concrete is also responsible for about 8 percent of global carbon emissions. If concrete were a country, it would rank third in emissions behind China and the United States.

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Can Truncated Domes Actually be Funny? Ask Mike.

Truncated Domes

Can Truncated Domes Actually be Funny? Ask Mike.

Some people love 'em, and some folks hate 'em. But the ADA law requires truncated domes as a safety and accessibility feature in public access properties. And then there's Mike, who insists that truncated domes are...funny.

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Video: Skateboarding Over Truncated Domes

Truncated Domes

Video: Skateboarding Over Truncated Domes

Often we are asked if truncated domes can be used as a deterrent to skateboarders. Well, truncated domes were not designed for that purpose. We doubt they would be effective. Then we came across a video that answers the question.

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What Street Addresses Reveal About Identity, Race, Wealth, and Power

Truncated Domes

What Street Addresses Reveal About Identity, Race, Wealth, and Power

Tracking a Haitian cholera outbreak, she describes how a lack of street addresses can be a matter of life or death. She points out that “about 70 percent of the world is insufficiently mapped, including many cities with more than a million people.” Adding that these are usually the planet’s poorest places, she quotes a Brazilian scientist who studied snake venom and observed, “Where there are snakes, there are no statistics; and where there are statistics, there are no snakes.”

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Truncated Domes Made From Living Concrete?

Truncated Domes

Truncated Domes Made From Living Concrete?

For centuries, builders have been making concrete roughly the same way: by mixing hard materials like sand with various binders, and hoping it stays fixed and rigid for a long time to come.

Now, an interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Colorado, Boulder, has created a rather different kind of concrete — one that is alive and can even reproduce.

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