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Drive-by lawsuits target parking lots: Got Truncated Domes?

ADA Pads & Your Business

Drive-by lawsuits target parking lots: Got Truncated Domes?

Outside the sliding glass doors of supermarkets. On the sidewalks next to crosswalks. At the entrances to office buildings and hotels.

What are those yellow plates on the ground with the ferocious bumpy surface that invites high heels to slip, trip, and win a date with an orthopedic surgeon?

They’re called truncated domes, and they’re intended to make it easier for vision-impaired individuals to detect a curb next to traffic.

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Black, Deaf and Extremely Online: Black American Sign Language

ADA Laws & Regulations

Black, Deaf and Extremely Online: Black American Sign Language

Variations and dialects of spoken English, including what linguists refer to as African-American English, have been the subject of intensive study for years. But research on Black ASL, which differs considerably from American Sign Language, is decades behind, obscuring a major part of the history of sign language.

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She’s a Chess Champion Who Can Barely See the Board

Truncated Domes Depot

She’s a Chess Champion Who Can Barely See the Board

“If I need to identify a piece during a game, I will lightly touch the top of it and say ‘identify,’ not grasping the piece, but just brushing it,” she says. Aside from that, says Michael Aigner, who was recently her teammate in the first Online Olympiad for People with Disabilities, “Nobody can tell that Jessica is blind.”

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Running Blind, and Running Free

Truncated Domes

Running Blind, and Running Free

In a typical year, more than 50 blind runners complete the California International Marathon with guides; 53 runners who identified themselves as having a vision impairment finished the New York City Marathon in 2019. Many others ran shorter races.

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Kiera Allen of ‘Run’ on Upending Disability Stereotypes

Truncated Domes Depot

Kiera Allen of ‘Run’ on Upending Disability Stereotypes

Kiera Allen makes her feature debut this week, playing opposite Sarah Paulson in the Hulu suspense film “Run.” It is a rare instance of a wheelchair user starring in a thriller.

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